Lisa Taylor

  • New study examines meditation as tool for anxious student journalists

    Feb. 1, 2018 By AMANDA POPE Staff reporter Ryerson journalism students are participating in a study investigating whether mindfulness and meditation can help them cope better with the stresses of the job. A four-week course led by associate professor Ann Rauhala and assistant professor Lisa Taylor, both from the School of Journalism, will introduce student journalists to mindfulness strategies for…

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  • Does the public have the right to know? How differing police practices on naming crime victims can affect reporting

    This is one of a series of features, news articles and videos on the June 2017 conference “Is no local news bad news? Local journalism and its future” hosted by the Ryerson Journalism Research Centre. To read more about the conference and local news, visit:  localnews.journalism.ryerson.ca. By SIERRA BEIN Staff reporter The first time Kim Bolan received a death threat…

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  • How crime reporting ethics shift through cultures

    This is one of a series of articles and videos on the June 2017 conference “Is no local news bad news? Local journalism and its future” hosted by the Ryerson Journalism Research Centre. Watch the full conference panel below. To read more about the conference and local news, visit:  localnews.journalism.ryerson.ca. By SIERRA BEIN Staff reporter Journalists around the world make…

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  • New book shows that press freedom in Canada is not a done deal

    By JASMINE BALA Staff reporter Threats to press freedom are actually threats to the public’s right to know, says the co-editor of a new book that examines efforts to undermine Canadian journalists’ abilities to do their jobs. Lisa Taylor, a lawyer, award-winning journalist and assistant professor at the Ryerson School of Journalism (RSJ), said that the discourse surrounding press freedom…

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  • Canada’s criminal libel laws threaten free speech, says Ryerson journalism professor

    By MAIJA KAPPLER Special to the RJRC An archaic Canadian law against criminal libel is being used with increasing frequency to shut down political dissent and criticism of police officers, judges and powerful institutions, new research by Ryerson University journalism professor Lisa Taylor suggests. Convictions for criminal libel averaged 18 cases per year between 2005 and 2008, Taylor found. She…

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